Found a Rabbit?

Central Oregon Rabbits

There are several members of the rabbit family found in Central Oregon, including mountain cottontail, pygmy rabbit, snowshoe hare, black-tailed jackrabbit, white-tailed jackrabbit, and the American pika. 

ODFW currently prohibits the rehabilitation of rabbits due to the highly contagious nature of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV). These restrictions help protect against the spread of RHDV, which is a lethal disease for rabbits. Think Wild is permitted to euthanize if it is a situation where the rabbit is obviously suffering. Please call ODFW if you suspect a rabbit is infected with RHDV: (541) 388-6363

DO NOT offer food or water to injured or orphaned rabbits! 

Below are tips for what to do if you find an injured or orphaned wild rabbit. 

Orphaned Rabbits

Reunite instructions:

  • Nest site KNOWN:
    • Recreate a nest as close to the original nest as possible
      • Use the nesting material from the original nest
      • Place extra material on top of nest for camouflage 
      • To see if the mom has returned you can gently place string over the nest in a grid-like pattern. If the string is disturbed and babies are still in the nest, mother has resumed care 
    •  

 

  • Nest site UNKNOWN:
    • Create a new nest close to where baby was found
    • Choose a spot under a shrub with ample camouflage
    • Place dry leaves and grass under baby(ies) and on top of them for camouflage
    • To see if the mom has returned you can gently place string over the nest in a grid-like pattern. If the string is disturbed and babies are still in the nest, mother has resumed care 

 

  • Important Notes:
    • Mother rabbits only visit the nest twice a day to not call attention to the nest by predators
    • Once a rabbit's ears are fully upright they are independent from their mom and no longer require care

Please contact the wildlife hotline ASAP if you find an injured or orphaned rabbit - (541) 241-8680

Conflicts with Rabbits?

Eating garden or other vegetation

  • Install appropriate fencing, such as chicken wire that is buried to keep rabbits out of the area
  • Place a concrete base under gates so that rabbits cannot dig under them
  • Use barriers around particular plants to protect them

 

Reach out to our wildlife services program for a free phone or email consultation or to schedule an in-person visit.